Saturday , April 4 2020
And then came internet
The age of apps (Pexels)

And then came ‘The Internet’

Remember the times when we would be chased around the house after coming all dirty and sweaty after playing in the grounds for a long time and also for passing study hours? Ah! Honestly those were the days. No matter how tearful and hurt we were after those whacks and ear-twistings, it has made us a little more disciplined than the kids of this technological era. When our parents say that they used to steal mangoes, vegetables, climb trees, go fishing and swimming in ponds for fun, doesn’t it get a smile to your face when you listen to them? I mean, it obviously does, so imagine you and your best friends doing those mischievous things now? That would be a hell lot of fun. But no! What did we do instead? We grew up in front of cartoons, Barbies, beyblades, video games (still do, right?), PSPs and what not. We have our good memories too, like having our friends over, hide and seek inside the house and badminton or football outside. Now look at our younger ones now who are growing up in our generation itself. In my opinion and yours too I guess, tablets, laptops and androids and ruined many young minds. No I am not specifying on the part that these kids don’t learn anything from the internet. Our siblings sometimes introduce us to subjects that we haven’t heard of and that leaves us dazed and interested at the same time. But is that all? They’re mostly stuck on the internet playing online games, downloaded apps and social networks. I have observed many and you are rightly allowed to disagree if you don’t think the same.

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Internet Addiction
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The age for making a facebook account itself was 18 but who followed that? No one. E-mail accounts itself have been made of 21 years of age when the kid is just 10. So what do you think? Trust me, I have done so too. But seeing kids grow up so fast, through internet is unpleasing. Before there were letters to communicate. There still is but it has lost its gravity and importance. Now we have whatsapp, snapchat, facebook, instagram, twitter to only name some for the forum of communication. Everything is digital. The feeling of a letter too would make anyone happy and satisfied. The personal touch in it, the handwriting and the texture of words could give you the feel which not even a text on your phone saying ‘hi’ can give. Moving on to scriptures, novels and books. It has become an easy get away for all (especially students) to have books available in the internet in the form of PDFs and PowerPoints. This as I believe has been extended to be displayed as printouts and readings. Now students may say, “What is the point of having books to be bought, borrowed and money spent in the process when we have everything available on our phones, laptops and photocopies?” They are absolutely right in their part too because in a way, they would call it a waste of money and having to do extra work when everything is already available. But during exams (which is only when students actually sit down to study and break their heads over notes), we strain our eyes till 4am and study till they get red and hurt. Yes that’s us and we have no idea how harmful that is even if we are helpless. Libraries now have become more like discussion group get togethers and sometimes even, non-caffeine cafes. Sounds ridiculous, yes but sure. Where is the silence and peace of having a book you like to read, having the entire hallway of books to yourself rather than having a Kindle in front of you? The rippling crisp sound of turning a page in your new book/novel and bewaring anyone who would make doggy-ears out of page edges to mark them?  Or even that strange but blissfully welcoming smell of a newly bought book? We have our opinions and this was mine. I leave this for your thoughts now but remember, modernisation is good, however, traditions are lessons to learn from and of course, old is definitely gold.

– By Aakankhya Bordoloi

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